Category: !General

  • what I’m up to

    This site has been a bit neglected for a number of years, especially when I moved into full-time administration. I’m back on faculty again, teaching full-time, but more recently my materials have been in university course management systems. I do have a growing number of YouTube videos – some public, some unlisted – covering what…

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  • (max) incrementalism – developing an arpeggiator

    incrementalism Applied to coding, incrementalism is more a philosophy than a tangible thing. It’s the idea that you break large project into small steps, to not try to do too much at once. Incrementalism encourages you to develop a small part of the project, test it, and expand it. We’ve been using incrementalism with the…

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  • (max) object inventory, tutorials

    Current students should be working their way through the first seven Max tutorials (“Hello” through “Numerical User Interfaces”). objects used so far <notein> <noteout> <makenote> <number> (number box, integer) <message> with “set” as a special message <stripnote> <button> (bang!) <toggle> <metro> <comment> objects to check out (we’ll use them soon) <random> <pgmout> <table> and <itable>…

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  • (max) beginnings of an arpeggiator patcher

    We’re starting our arpeggiator patcher, learning some basics of how Max works, and how to translate our what we want to do into Max code. goal Receive a midi note input from a MIDI keyboard to set a pitch, and play that pitch at a regular, repeating time interval. translation We can translate parts of that common…

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  • (must115) digital audio data

    This post is both a summary and an expansion of topics in chapter 6 of An Introduction to Music Technology, by Hoskens. comparing analog and digital signals To understand the difference between analog and digital signals, you must understand that analog signals are continuous fluctuations, while digital signals are comprised of discrete values. Hoskens illustrates the difference…

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  • (must115) setting up a simple recording in pro tools

    To complete the first project, you will need to record yourself speaking a poem. Doing so will require at least one track of audio and performing some simple setup steps. external hardware – audio interface We use Native Instruments Komplete Audio 6 for audio input and output in the lab. It’s a USB-powered interface with…

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  • (must115) setting up pro tools 12

    pro tools and DAWs Pro Tools is an example of a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW). Pro Tools relies (mostly) on non-destructive processing and mixing. The program allows for multiple sounds to be used at once by reading from the multiple sound files, applying gain changes as indicated by mix commands, and applying processing through plugins.…

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  • (must115) tell me who you are

    To help me learn who you are, I want each of you to fill out an “electronic note card.” Include: Preferred name (no DJ names yet) Year in school (incl. transfer, non-traditional, post-baccalaureate) Instrument Home town Fun fact about yourself photo (attachment) Due Wednesday, August 26

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  • (must115) opening day welcome

    faculty staff in the program Dr. Jason Bolte, Director of Music Technology, Assistant Professor, Academic Advisor Dr. Linda Antas, Assistant Professor of Music Technology, Academic Advisor Dr. Keith Kothman, Director of the School of Music, Professor of Music Technology Josh McRae, Computer Support Specialist other staff Kim Eggemeyer, Administrative Office.Right now Kim is the only…

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